Hafeni Muzanima is sort of a wanderlust on an artist map. When the mildly eccentric pitchfork isn’t drooling creative ideas into a bucket of collective genius, he spends most of his time writing and erasing, writing and erasing and then writing words, once more, to elaborate perfection. In the comatose dark, you will find him fiddling with life questions and when he’s had enough of it, he will eagerly drop his thickset worries into a bottomless pit of “don’t worry. Be happy!” Valiantly fabulous, Hafeni seamlessly draws parallels between his time writing atypical poems and and congregating with his power ladies over a good wine.

 

Gangsterism in black Cinema must also just stop. We aren’t getting anywhere with that shit.

wakeupslaves:

12 Racist Logos You Didn’t Know Were Used by Popular Brands

 | Posted by A Moore 


Negro – Magic Steel Wool

Arab website Kabobfest.com reports that this steel wool is manufactured by the German company Oscar Weil, which is owned by the German-Jewish Weil family. The Weils were disowned by the Nazis, but the company was returned to the family after WWII. The “Negro – Magic Steel Wool” logo is actually what a Lebanese importing company uses to market and sell the steel wool in the Middle East. This steel wool is apparently the Middle East’s No. 1 seller.

Aunt Jemima

Aunt Jemima is arguably the most well-known and longest-lasting brand that used a racist caricature to market its product. When Charles Rutt and Charles G. Underwood created a self-rising flour in 1889, Rutt called it Aunt Jemima’s recipe after watching a minstrel show that featured a skit with a Southern mammy named Jemima. In 1989, Quaker Oats, which had purchased the Aunt Jemima Mill Co. in 1926, updated Jemima’s image to a modern African-American woman. But the name stayed.

Black Man Cookie

These weird cookies are made in Romania and are sold in Romania, Turkey and Albania. They are called “Black Man” cookies, obviously in reference to Black people. This edible but racist caricature wears a cape, the letter “B” on his chest, features wavy cornrow-looking hair and a large nose and lips. And, of course, the cookie is chocolate.


Uncle Ben’s Rice

The image of an elderly black man has appeared in ads for Uncle Ben’s Rice since 1946. Like Aunt Jemima, the caricature represented a racial stereotype that lingered after slavery. And, just like Aunt Jemima, the Uncle Ben logo has been updated to reflect a more modern Black person. Also in the same vein as the pancake brand, the name remains, carrying on the practice of whites addressing elderly African-Americans as “uncle” and “aunt” because the titles “Mr.” and “Mrs.” were deemed unsuitable for Blacks.

Chiquita Bananas

Generations of Americans have grown up eating Chiquita bananas. Some may remember Miss Chiquita, the sexually flamboyant Latin American caricature the banana company used to brand the fruit since 1944.

Miss Chiquita is widely thought to have been inspired byBrazilian actress and singer Carmen Miranda, who appeared in ads for Chiquita bananas. The actress has been accused of promoting the exotic Latina stereotype because she became famous for wearing pieces of fruit on her head and revealing, tropical clothing.

Some critics argue that this stereotype is even more offensive because the women, men and children who worked in banana farms toiled in grueling conditions, often falling gravely ill as a result of pesticide exposure.


 

Land O’ Lakes Butter

In 1928, officials from Land O’ Lakes welcomed the idea of using a Native-American woman’s image to sell its butter because the company is based in Minnesota — home of Hiawatha and Minnehaha.

H. Mathew Barkhausen III,  a writer who is of Cherokee and Tuscarora descent, has criticized the image of the Land O’ Lakes maiden, calling it stereotypical. She wears two braids in her hair, a headdress and an animal skin frock with beaded embroidery. Also, for some, the maiden’s serene countenance erases the suffering indigenous people have experienced in the United States.

“Like the hoary fantasies of ‘Indians’ and ‘Pilgrims’ sharing with quiet reverence the first ‘Thanksgiving,’ the Land O’ Lakes butter maiden helps white Americans sidestep and repress the horrific realities of what white Americ


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Cream of Wheat

Nadra Kareem Nittle of About.com writes that when Emery Mapes of the North Dakota Diamond Milling Co. set out in 1893 to find an image to market his breakfast porridge, now called Cream of Wheat, he decided the portrayal of a subservient and uneducated Black chef was the best fit.

In a 1921 advertisement, the grinning chef — who was given the name Rastus — holds up a chalkboard with these words: “Maybe Cream of Wheat aint got no vitamines. I dont know what them things is. If they’s bugs they aint none in Cream of Wheat…”

Rastus represented the black man as a childlike, nonthreatening slave. The purpose was to portray African-Americans as content with a separate but (un)equal existence while making white Southerners of the time feel nostalgic about the slavery era. Though there are petitionscalling for its removal the caricature still remains on the promotional packaging for Cream of Wheat today.


 
Conguitos 

Conguitos are the Spanish version of M&Ms – a chocolate-covered peanut snack.  Notice how the name bears a resemblance to the name Congo, which may hint at where the inspiration for the sweets came from. Even if this is not true, the character on the front of the packet speaks for itself.

Fazer Licorice Sticks

For 80 years, Fazer licorice sticks have been wrapped in paper adorned with a “blackface” caricature that many Finnish citizens deemed as ”familiar and positive mental images,” according to the company. Pressure from the EU, Finnish Consumer Agency and Ombudsman, media and others have forced Fazer to change its “racist” mascot. In 2007, Fazer announced that it will phase out the use of the caricature in an effort to have more international appeal.

Eskimo Pie

Most people do not know that a slow-moving and largely unpublicized battle in North America’s northland has quietly raged on against the use of the word “Eskimo” to describe people with Inuit heritage. Therefore, the ice cream treat that uses the derogatory term for the North American tribe became the subject of controversy in 2009 when a Canadian Inuit woman said the product name insulted her heritage. However, the bad publicity has failed to persuade manufacturer Cadbury Pascall to consider a new name.

Watermelon Soda

Many Black people refuse to eat watermelon in public because of the racist stereotype, with roots embedded in slavery, that suggests they have undying love for the fruit. However, this didn’t stop the Miami-based Cawy Bottling Co. from marketing its watermelon soda with a mascot that depicts an image of a Black girl with ponytails eating watermelon on one side and an image of a white boy on the other.  In 2009, Target pulled the beverage from its shelves after coming under fire for selling the watermelon soda with the controversial images.

Darkie Toothpaste

A toothpaste known as “Darkie,” featuring a smiling blackface performer as its logo, was sold for years in various parts of Asia. It was originally manufactured in Shanghai by the Hawley & Hazel Chemical Co. before being bought by the Colgate-Palmolive Co. After pressure from shareholders, religious groups and Black people, Colgate-Palmolive renamed Darkie and redesigned its logo.

Changing the name from Darkie to Darlie didn’t seem to be much of a drastic change; for, while the logo did change to a smiling man of ambiguous racial background in a top hat, in Chinese, the world “darlie” means “black person,” according to Wikipedia.
The product, despite its infamous history, is still sold widely across Asia today, expan

wizzard890:

xshruglife:



“Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde


Forever reblog

This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.
Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.
Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.
In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 
But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.
In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.
So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

wizzard890:

xshruglife:


“Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde

Forever reblog

This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.

Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.

Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.

In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 

But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.

In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.

So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

(Source: defpro)

Without deep conversation, my mind becomes restless. I need passion and intellect, it’s a shame that a person often lacks one or the other.

. (via dahlia—noir)

The perfect mix…. *ahem.

(via johnsmith67)

(Source: c0ntemplations)

My darling, are you visually impaired? Do you not see me standing between your future and your pride?

dynamicafrica:

"Black man, you are on your own" - Steve Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977).

September 12th, marks the day South Africa anti-Apartheid activist and Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko was killed in police custody in Pretoria. Biko had been arrested a month earlier in Port Elizabeth where he had been detained and tortured, resulting in him falling into a coma.

Nearly dead and suffering a serious and untreated head injury, Biko was transported to Pretoria by car and died shortly after his arrival at the prison there. Police at the time would claim and broadcast to the world that Biko died due to a hunger strike but an autopsy and photographs taken of Biko postmortem, exposed with the help of journalists Donald Woods and Helen Zille, revealed that he had died as a result of the injuries he sustained whilst in police custody.

Today, nearly 40 years after his death at age 30, we remember a man that fought for an end to the brutality he and countless others suffered and still do today. The fight is far from over.

A luta continua!